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Recycled fabric option

22/10/2011

We are excited to be launching a new range of thermal blinds made using 100% recycled polyester fabric from a UK company.  The new recycled fabric range by Camira Fabrics is from their Second Nature range named ‘Urban Plus’, with 30 colours to choose from – download a pattern card here and see some of the colours below. If you require extra wide fabric then the Lucia range is available at 1700mm wide (download here). You can see our standard fabric range for the thermal blinds in ten colours here.

recycled fabric

recycled fabric colours – neutrals

recycled fabric

recycled fabric colours – red/yellows

recycled fabric

recycled fabric colours – green/blues

recycled blind

Sample blind in Camira Urban Plus ‘Avenue’

Here is more information from Camira Fabrics about recycled polyester;

The need for sustainable fabrics

It’s so obvious… We’re producing and consuming vast quantities of synthetic fibres. They’re all made from oil. So one day their raw material input will run out. What’s more, when they’re disposed of most of them end up buried in landfill sites and degrade only very very slowly. Polyester is by far the world’s most popular man-made petro-chemical textile fibre, with global fibre production standing at 29 million tonnes in 2007 – that’s the equivalent of nearly 90 million pallets of yarn! And polyester production is estimated to increase to 39 million tonnes by 2012 (source: Man-Made Fiber Year book 2008, published by Chemical Fibers International).

So what’s the answer? Using recycled raw materials can certainly help, by saving virgin resources, diverting waste away from landfill and giving it a new lease of life as a product with value. Or using totally natural and renewable textile fibres, derived from plants or animals, provided there are no harmful environmental impacts in their cultivation or conversion into usable base materials. Our preference is for wool and bast fibres which are obtained from the stems of certain plants.

Recycled polyester

We’re all learning to recycle more rather than throwing things away. After all, there is no “away”, as these things have to go somewhere, usually to landfill. We’ve been avoiding landfill accumulation by using waste products as a basis for making recycled fabrics for over 10 years; we now offer several recycled polyesters and a recycled eco-leather.

Polyester is made by reacting two petro-chemicals together, ethylene glycol and dimethyl naphtalate, to create polyethylene terephthalate (PET). It’s the same material used to make plastic drinks bottles which are produced and discarded in massive volumes. Allied to this post-consumer waste is a mass of post-industrial waste created by manufacturers before their PET products ever get to consumers. We’ve used both types, from different suppliers, to make recycled polyester fabrics, removing the need to drill, refine and transport crude oil, separating it into petro-chemicals and adding other additives to turn it into the fibre we can weave. Instead we’ve chosen to re-use materials – already made from precious natural resources – which can be turned back into polyester fibre more easily than starting afresh from oil.

Life cycle assessment conclusively demonstrates that fabrics manufactured from 100% recycled polyester have significantly less environmental impact than those manufactured from virgin polyester. Here are just some of the improvements (Source: Interface Research Corporation 2002):

Embodied energy – 66% improvement
Ozone depletion potential – 64% improvement
Global warming potential  – 46% improvement
Acidification potential – 25% improvement
Water used – 27% improvement

baled milk bottles, image by siftnz

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